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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) and Ecology of Silver Sagebrush (Artemisia Cana Prush Subsp. Cana) found in the catalog.

Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) and Ecology of Silver Sagebrush (Artemisia Cana Prush Subsp. Cana)

Alberta.

Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) and Ecology of Silver Sagebrush (Artemisia Cana Prush Subsp. Cana)

by Alberta.

  • 357 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Alberta Public Affairs Bureau .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Birds & Birdwatching - General,
  • Nature

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10973521M
    ISBN 100778529312
    ISBN 109780778529316
    OCLC/WorldCa56535257

    Sage-grouse obtain resources for breeding, summer, and winter life stages from sagebrush communities. Grazing can change the productivity, composition, and structure of herbaceous plants in.   The SSGA and Parks Canada hope a unique project will help restore the habitat for three at-risk species, including the greater sage grouse. Jeannie Stafford / U.S. .

    The other major regulatory component to sage-grouse conservation are the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management plans, now under revision. The plans guide grazing, energy development, and other activities on BLM holdings, which in Montana comprise 30 percent of sage-grouse .   Beneficial grazing management practices for sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and ecology of silver sagebrush (Artemisia cana Pursh ssp. cana) in southeastern Alberta. Lethbridge, Alberta: Public Lands and Forests Division, Alberta Sustainable Resource : Laura K. Hickman, Peggy Ann Desserud, Barry W. Adams, C. Cormack Gates.

    The primary purpose of this CCAA is to promote grazing practices that reduce or eliminate threats to sage-grouse on the enrolled lands and ensure grazing practices that are neutral or beneficial to sage-grouse can likely continue unaffected if the species is listed in the future. This. Johnsgard, ). Moreover, the greater sage-grouse (C. urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse) which is listed by the IUCN as near threatened (Storch, ) was also considered by the USFWS for ESA protection (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ). Grazing by livestock is the pre-dominant land use within the current sage-grouse range and a paucityCited by: 7.


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Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) and Ecology of Silver Sagebrush (Artemisia Cana Prush Subsp. Cana) by Alberta. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Beneficial grazing management practices for sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and ecology of silver sagebrush (Artemisia cana Pursh subsp.

cana) in southeastern Alberta: final report - January by Adams, Barry; Alberta. Pages: The biomass that remains after grazing is a result of the stocking rate so correctly managing stocking rates will largely ensure adequate habitat and food for Sage-Grouse.

The document also encourages practices that enhance grassland habitat such as sagebrush cover. The purpose of the project was to gather existing knowledge about the grazing history and current grazing practices in the sage-grouse range area of southeastern Alberta.

The report will provide a context for the sage-grouse recovery team when considering grazing processes and practices in relation to managing wildlife species on rangelands including species-at-risk. and cover. Beneficial grazing management practices for Sage-Grouse are reviewed including grazing intensity, livestock distribution practices, onset of grazing, grazing systems and specialized grazing practices.

Grazing management should focus on the overall health of the whole range landscape, since Sage-Grouse appear to use all major plant communities identified in the. Beneficial grazing management practices for Sage-Grouse are reviewed including grazing intensity, livestock distribution practices, onset of grazing, grazing systems and specialized grazing practices.

This book is the most comprehensive book available on the ecology and conservation of sage grouse, citing the latest scientific studies with lots of charts, tables, and graphics to help illustrate the concepts discussed. If you're science-phobic or looking for a book on hunting sage grouse this may not be the book 5/5(2).

Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage–Grouse Alberta Sustainable Resource Development. The Range Management Branch of Alberta Sustainable Resource Development created this document in order to provide land managers with grazing management practices that will enhance Sage-Grouse habitat on their land.

New research shows that — done right — livestock grazing may help conserve sage grouse habitat by keeping working ranches profitable and sustainable. Photos by Joe Smith. Improper livestock grazing has been proposed as a contributing factor to habitat degradation since overgrazing can reduce concealing cover provided by vegetation around the birds’ nests.

Common conservation practices for the greater sage-grouse include prescribed grazing, removal of invasive conifers, and restoration of wet meadows. Technical assistance is free. The greater sage-grouse is a nationally identified target species of the Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW) partnership, a collaborative approach to conserve habitat while keeping working lands working.

Sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) management guidelines are typically made based on characteristics and measurements of vegetation within a few feet or yards from a nest.

Managers take those fine-scale measures and apply them on a large scale — to a pasture or grazing allotment. Given the range-wide reports of declining sage-grouse populations during our study period and the nearly ubiquitous nature of livestock grazing across sage-grouse range, it is imperative that the conservation community increase our understanding of the influence of rangeland management practices on sage-grouse populations (Connelly and Braun Cited by: Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse Final Report Beneficial Grazing Management Practices for Sage Grouse (Centrocercus Urophasianus) and Ecology of Silver Sagebrush Read more».

Fires are the single biggest management challenge and the most significant threat to core sage grouse habitat on Squaw Valley Ranch. Sincethe number of fires on any particular piece of the ranch ranges from none to four ().Roughlyacres have not burned, whileacres have burned once, 75, acres have burned twice, 23, acres have burned three times, and just less than Cited by: 2.

the expectations of the EPO. This approach will help producers view sage grouse as an asset on the land, rather than a liability, and will encourag e uptake of beneficial management practices for sage grouse.

Continued assistance with the removal of page-wire fence lines and installation ofFile Size: KB. Sage-Grouse Habitat Stewardship for a grazing permittee or lessee.

Sage-Grouse Habitat Stewardship for a collaborative team in recognition of an overall collaborative effort. Nominations should not only be considered for new and innovative efforts, but also to recognize the efforts of those committed to longstanding effective resource management.

Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications.

The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University. Technical and financial assistance provided by SGI through the NRCS to enhance grazing practices may help conserve sage grouse habitat by keeping ranching operations profitable and sustainable.

Shown above is variation in shrub and herbaceous cover between nests in the Great Basin (left) and Great Plains (right). The Lander Resource Management Plan updates a nearly year old document and is the first of the BLM’s resource management plans to address management of important greater sage-grouse habitat.

Ninety-nine percent of the Lander area is habitat for the species and 70 percent of the planning area is identified as priority habitat warranting. During periods of drought, reduce stocking rates or change management practices for livestock if nesting cover and brood-rearing habitat requirements are not being met.

Wild Horses Where wild horse and burro populations are adversely affecting sage grouse, the BLM evaluates for herd populations and reduces as necessary.

Beneficial grazing management practices for sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and ecology of silver sagebrush (Artemisia cana Pursh subsp.

cana) in southeastern Alberta: final report -. A rancher in Joe Smith’s study area moves cattle back onto native sagebrush-grassland pasture after branding. ©Joe Smith. As habitat loss and fragmentation continue to threaten the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a study in Montana found livestock grazing seems to have little impact on the bird’s nest success, and rotational grazing, meant to improve habitat for the .Inthe U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) designated the Upper Columbia populations (Washington State) of the western greater sage-grouse (Centrocerucus urophasianus phaios) as candidates for listing under the Endangered Species Act ofas amended (Act), 16 U.S.C.

et seq., due to their limited distribution and population numbers.The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), also known as the sagehen, is the largest grouse (a type of bird) in North America.

Its range is sagebrush country in the western United States and southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, was known as simply the sage grouse until the Gunnison sage-grouse was recognized as a separate species in Family: Phasianidae.